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government was elected three months ago, a government forcing through yet another round of punishing spending cuts. in a country where one in four are already unemployed, perhaps one shouldn't be surprised the public anger at times tips over into violence. the morning had seen tens of thousands march on parliament demanding the government change course. they know it's hopeless, of course, their leaders are deep in negotiations with europe and the i.m.f. about cutting wages and pensions by anything up to 30%. and this in a city where already one in three businesses has closed. >> we have to do something for our future to have a regular job, to have a family. >> all of europe should have a voice against these policies. >> reporter: there will be little reassurance of promises of no more cuts after these. >> there is no scope for any further reductions in wages and pensions beyond this specific package. this is a commitment that the government has made. >> reporter: the greeks have been told that before. >> yes, they have been told that before. but should the government not meet that commitment,
of what a definition of prevention, a goal to which both governments agree what a definition would be in practice. >> woodruff: i was reading today there was disagreement inside netanyahu's own government that the israeli foreign ministry concludes that the economic sanctions are hitting iran hard calling for another round of economic sanctions. is that significant? >> the economic sanctions are hitting iran the iranian economy is in trouble and the reason why we haven't seen results with regard to the iranian negotiating position is that the p 5 plus 1 has not put on the table anything in the way-- the united states and the other five powers that have been negotiating have not put on the table significant sanctions related-- basically no sanctions relate other than the airplane parts. >> here i disagree with paul very much. the economic sanctions have been a wonderful success and an abysmal failure. they've been a success at raising the economic cost to the iranians but if their real goal is to compel the iranians to change the nuclear policy they've had no visible impact. so that
over the years. there's two main categories they have. one is how to reduce the size of government, and the other half of it is this model legislation that's in the corporate good. in other words, there's a profit driven legislation. how can you open up a new market? how can you privatize something that can open up a market for a company? and between those two divisions you are kind of getting to the same end goal which is really kind of ultimate privatization of everything. >> mark pocan is something of an expert on alec. in fact, to learn as much about it as he could, he became a member. >> what i realized is if you join alec for a mere hundred dollars as a legislator you have the full access like any corporate member. >> he also took himself to an alec conference for a first-hand look. >> hi, i'm state representative mark pocan. welcome to my video blog. i'm outside the marriott on canal street in new orleans at the alec convention, american legislative exchange council. that was where you watch the interaction of a room full of lobbyists-free drinks, free cigars, wining, dining
afghan civilians and police were killed. in iraq, the government announced 365 people were killed during september, the most in more than two years. the total included 26 iraqis who died sunday. a wave of bombings targeted shi- ite neighborhoods, from the northern city of kirkuk to the southern town of kut. the iraqi affiliate of al-qaeda claimed responsibility. iran has restored access to google's e-mail service, a week after the government blocked it. the initial action against g-mail was taken after an anti- islamic video appeared on google's video hosting site, youtube. but the loss of service drew complaints from users, including members of the iranian parliament. the people of greece got more grim news today: they're facing a sixth year of recession. a draft budget projected the greek economy will shrink again in 2013 by almost 4%. unemployment is set to rise another full point, to nearly 25%. meanwhile, euro-zone officials reported unemployment across the continent remained at a record high of 11.4% in august. . >> the figure is much higher than a year ago. it demonstrates the imp
this week in spain and greece over government austerity measures are reminders the european debt crisis is far from solved. today, spain unveiled its 2013 budget, promising more big budget cuts as the government tries to reduce its heavy deficit. as turmoil and tension in the euro-zone escalates, there remain questions about the longevity of the euro currency. today, italian prime minister mario monti said he doesn't think any country will leave the union. erika miller reports from new york. >> reporter: as italian prime minister mario monti left today's event, he dodged reporters and walked straight to a waiting car. earlier at the forum, it was a different story. calm, cool and collected, monti stayed carefully on message. he made it clear italy is better off as part of the european union. >> the euro brought to italy a single currency, shared with all the others, that is very important economically. >> reporter: monti also emphasized the benefits of the common currency for other member countries, like germany. >> thanks to the euro, germany was able and is able to have a huge europea
of increased government regulation that went into effect a year ago. frost started looking for ways to simplify fees five years ago. its basic account carries a $5 monthly fee. but like many banks, if the account balance is above a certain level, the fee is waived. >> we have found that this account that i just described to you is excellence at a fair price. we give the quality service and it's a fair price and we have found that our customers embrace it. >> reporter: evans puts the cost of new bank regulation on the industry at $13 billion, a cost that's being passed on to consumers. according to a new survey by bankrate, the percentage of free checking accounts offered by banks continues to drop, only 39% of non-interest checking accounts are available to all customers free of charge, that's down nearly 50% in the past three years. other banking fees are also on the rise: >> we continue to see pretty steady increases in the old standbys. things like atm fees and overdraft charges but even with regard to checking accounts. not only are more accounts charging fees now because of the decline in
of the internet, but also it's the first responsibility of governments to control the mobs, to essential... they have the obligation to keep diplomatic missions safe. and there's always going to be things that people aren't going to like. but at the end of the day, people in these societies have delegitimize violence and essentially say no matter how much you disagree with what someone says or writes, it does not give you the right to go out and cause violence. if they do, you the governments have to stop it. that's your obligation under various international charters, under the united nations. i think that's an important message for the world to hear, an important message for the egyptian government to hear. >> ifill: nick burns let's talk about two sticky points when it comes to foreign policy: iran and syria. in both cases in the speech he said we need to speak out against it whether it's assad leaving or syria stopping the slaughter of its own people but he didn't outline exactly what the u.s. would do next about that. that's what some of his critics have said he has come up short on
rates, business is beginning to boom for many home builders. the government says in august americans purchased new homes at a seasonally adjusted rate of 373,000. that was down slightly from july, but up nearly 28% from august of last year. subkowiak thinks many buyers were hoarding cash during the recession and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million and a half. now we'
, but not on any resolution to the scheduled tax increases in government spending cuts. the nonpartisan tax policy center figures taxeses will go up by almost $3500 per household next year if certain tax cuts are allowed to expire. the report says 90% of households would see higher federal taxes. you can learn more about the fiscal cliff and why it matters, go to our website: www.nbr.com. nokia is on track to team up with major software-maker oracle. the finnish cell phone company is giving oracle access to its mapping services. financial details of the deal were not disclosed. but the move comes as nokia recently signed mapping deals with groupon, and amazon. last week apple's c.e.o. apologized for the shortcomings of its new map service. >> susie: and american express has agreed to pay millions of dollars in refunds to settle accusations from regulators that it deceived customers. the violations include: unlawful late fees, misleading consumers about debt collection, and age discrimination. amex will pay more than $100 million in fines, and give payouts to about 250,000 customers. consumers that
the financial crisis is another. and the growing government debt. that said, i mean i wouldn't underestimate the upside with the u.s. being such a creative economy. for example, energy prices have fallen a lot. and there are some other things you can count to on the upside. but so far businesses have been very reluctant to invest heavily, very reluctant to hire heavily. >> muhamed el-erian what do you see-- when you look at all this data coming in, what is most important to you? >> a few things. first the employment picture. and not just whether we're creating jobs or not. that's important. but also what's happening to those who remain unemployed. and that is a pretty worsening picture. that's why i call 2 a crisis. because long-term unemployment is really high. and youth unemployment is really high. and these are longer-term issues that we need to deal with. so the employment picture is very important. second, clarity for businesses. today no one has the confidence to invest. there is a ton of money, judy, on the sideline, a ton of money. and if we can engage that money in the system would
in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically important? >> reporter: new rules may also push cash into unregulated investments or bank accounts. >> and putting even more money into the banking system and more burdens onto its insurance system seems to me the opposite direction from the way we want to be going when we are trying to solve the too big to fail problem. >> reporter: during the financial crisis, the treasury was forced to guarantee money market funds, a risk it doesn't want to take again. darren gersh, "nightly business report," washington. >> tom: u.s. stocks ended their best quarter today since 2010, despite some weakness today. investors locked in profits today after another set of disappointing economic data. a measure of business activity in the midwest fell to 49.7 in septmber from 53 in august, the first such contraction in three years. and a national gauge of consumer sentiment slipped to 78.3, after registering 79.2 earlier in the month. meanwhile, spain's banks got a passing grade
segment. three focus on the economy, four, five, and six health care, the role of government and governing. procedure, each candidate gets two minutes to respond to a question posed by jim lara. time remaining is given to freewheeling discussion of segments. risk factor, dangerous, sometimes lethal. ♪ [music] ♪ >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? is america as respected throughout the world as it was? do you feel that our security is as safe, that we're as strong as we were four years ago? if you answer all of those questions yes, why then i think your choice is obvious as to who you'll vote for. if you don't agree, if you don't think that this course that we've been on for the last four years is what you would like to see us follow for the next four, then i could suggest another choice that you have. >> jimmy jimmy carter practical gagging. question, who will win the debate on tuesday? can romney pull a rea
of homs, as government troops target rebel bastions. >> one-and-a-half years after it began and the battle for this city and for syria grinds on relentlessly. the bombardment of hommes. the war here is as intense as ever. >> ifill: as world leaders gather in new york for the annual meeting of the united nations general assembly. margaret warner gives us a preview. >> woodruff: will new genetic findings reshape the treatment of breast cancer? we ask dr. harold varmus, head of the national cancer institute. >> ifill: and ray suarez kicks off american graduate week with a conversation with three now- successful people who know exactly what it's like to want to drop out of high school. >> sometimes we give up on kids too soon. sometimes we want to teach to the test instead of teaching to transform. sometimes that comes from top-down policies. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailore
program. and a european central bank member said his agency would not help restructure greek government debt. also weighing on stocks today, high anxiety about third-quarter earnings. u.s. corporate profits have outpaced the broader economy since the end of the great recession, but profits warnings yesterday from caterpillar, and recently from intel, fedex and burberry, suggest the boom in earnings is finally beginning to fizzle. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at how the numbers are shaping up for third quarter and beyond. >> reporter: the start of reporting season for corporate america is still two weeks away, but already on wall street, the worrying about profits is heating up. and it sounds like investors have good reason to be nervous. after all, analysts predict companies in the s&p 500 will see earnings drop an average of 2% in the third quarter. if that happens, it will be the first such decline in three years. tough comparisons are partly responsible, as last year's third quarter was one of the best ever. on top of that, however, global demand remains weak. >> i think we're j
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)